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ETHS Sponsoring Virtual FAN Events on October 26 and October 28

 

October 21, 2021  1:30pm CT

 

Evanston Township High School is sponsoring two virtual Family Action Network events on October 26 and October 28. Both events are free and open to the public, suitable for ages 12 and up. Registration is required.

 

FAN Event on October 26
Jeff Selingo and Adam Harris
(image from www.familyactionnetwork.net)

 

“Who Gets In and Why: A Year Inside College Admissions,” a conversation between Jeff Selingo and Adam Harris, will be held on Tuesday, October 26, beginning at 7:00pm via Zoom. Registration is required.

 

Award-winning journalist Jeff Selingo spent parts of 2018 and 2019 embedded at three different universities to get an inside look at the admissions process: University of Washington, Davidson College, and Emory University. He was trying to answer the central question millions of college-bound kids and their parents ask themselves every year: who gets in, and why? The answer, it turns out, is surprising, and has a lot more to do with the college or university’s needs than with what’s best for students.

 

In his 2020 best-selling book Who Gets In and Why: A Year Inside College Admissions, named among the 100 Notable Books of the year by The New York Times, Selingo shares what he learned from months inside the college admission process. Most of us probably believe that this process is about merit, grades, and SAT scores, rewarding the best students, but Selingo presents a more complicated truth, showing that who gets in is more frequently about the college’s agenda than about the applicant. In a world where thousands of equally qualified students vie for a fixed number of spots at elite institutions, admissions officers often make split-second decisions based on a variety of factors—including whether a student will enroll if accepted.

 

Selingo will be in conversation with Adam Harris, a staff writer at The Atlantic where he has covered education and national politics since 2018. He is the author of the 2021 book The State Must Provide: Why America’s Colleges Have Always Been Unequal – And How to Set Them Right, a narrative history of racial inequality in higher education.

 

The October 26 event will be recorded and available later on FAN’s website and YouTube channel. A bonus after-hours event is also available to webinar attendees. For more information, visit www.familyactionnetwork.net.

 

 

FAN Event on October 28
Dawn Turner and Heidi Stevens
(image from www.familyactionnetwork.net)

 

“Three Girls from Bronzeville: A Uniquely American Memoir of Race, Fate, and Sisterhood,” a conversation between Dawn Turner and Heidi Stevens, will be held on Thursday, October 28, beginning at 7:00pm via Zoom. Registration is required.

 

The animating question at the center of award-winning journalist Dawn Turner’s profound, gorgeously written, and resonant memoir Three Girls from Bronzeville: A Uniquely American Memoir of Race, Fate, and Sisterhood is: when did we lose them? Them being the author’s sister, Kim, and her best friend, Debra. One dead by 25, the other imprisoned for decades after killing a man. Why did they fall behind while another graduated college and became an award-winning journalist? Why was Dawn given grace to learn from her mistakes while Debra and Kim never recovered?

 

They were third-generation daughters of the Great Migration, who came of age in the 1970s, in the warm glow of the recent civil rights movement. It offered them a promise, albeit nascent and fragile, that they would have more opportunities, rights, and freedoms than any generation of Black Americans in history. Their working-class, striving parents were eager for them to realize this hard-fought potential. The girls had big dreams for themselves as well: Dawn and Debra both planned to be doctors, Kim a teacher. But then they arrived at a precipice, a fraught rite of passage for all girls when the dangers and the harsh realities of the world burst the innocent bubble of childhood, when the choices they made could—and would—have devastating consequences. There was a razor thin margin of error, especially for brown girls.

 

Turner honed her reporter’s skill in two decades at the Chicago Tribune. It is this keen eye that she trains on her personal story, resulting in a memoir that offers timely and powerful observations about the complex interplay of race, class, and opportunity in America.

 

Turner will be in conversation with Heidi Stevens, also formerly of the Tribune, now creative director of Parent Nation, a new initiative at University of Chicago’s TMW Center for Early Learning + Public Health.

 

The October 28 event will be recorded and available later on FAN’s website and YouTube channel. A bonus after-hours event is also available to webinar attendees. For more information, visit www.familyactionnetwork.net.